Anti-Racism Syllabus
Winter-Spring 2021

Last updated January 12, 2021

During the Summer of 2020, the UC Davis community responded to the death of George Floyd, and the unjust killings of too many other Black people in America with a period of acknowledgment, mourning, reflection, and reckoning. We are in the process of moving from isolated allyship to action.

The DEI office embarked upon a journey with the campus to address racism and elevate awareness of racism and bias, those that are explicit and implicit. The curation of the “Resources for Racial Trauma” website was a strong step. All are encouraged to spend time on the site and learn more from the resources that are posted there. In addition to having resources available for individual self-reflection, various departments offered facilitated opportunities for professional development during the summer.

If you have events that we can add, please e-mail Tom O'Donnell with the details. 

You can find the Summer-Fall 2020 syllabus at the bottom of this page.

DATE TITLE DESCRIPTION
1/12/21 UCD School of Law, Lisa Fairfax, Professor, George Washington University Law School, 'Racial reckoning with economic inequities: board diversity as a symptom and partial cure' In response to the racial reckoning related to the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other unarmed Black men and women by police during the summer of 2020, many corporations publicly expressed their commitment not only to grappling with racial inequities in the economic sphere, but also to increasing racial diversity on their boards, with particular emphasis on Black directors. Professor Fairfax argues that while board diversity is responsive to the call for racial equity, we may be unable to heed that call without more extensively addressing the racial bias that pervades existing board recruitment and selection practices.  
1/13/21 UC Davis School of Law, Insurrection and the Rule of Law Join us as UC Davis Law faculty provide context to the recent unprecedented and troubling events that have challenged the foundation of our democracy. After a mob of trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol last week to prevent the certification of President-elect Biden's election victory, our professors will provide their legal and historical perspectives, offer insights into the implications of this tumultuous election and take your questions.
1/14/21 ITSP - Cultural Humility and the Interruption of Scripts of Racial Inequality In this session we will make visible often unspoken social scripts we hole for “The Other” and for ourselves that may impact our encounters and service to others. (If we can see it, we can confront it, interrupt it, and potentially transform it). We will outline key components of Cultural Humility as an approach to interrupt these scripts of inequality.  Finally, we will distinguish between Diversity Training, Cultural Competence Education, and Identity Work.
1/15/21 History Department, Town Hall Meeting on the January 6, 2021 Insurrection Featuring Gregory Downs (Reconstruction and white supremacy); Katheryn Olmsted (Conspiracy theories); Eric Rauchway (Presidential transitions); David Biale (Weimar analogies); Justin Leroy (Black Lives Matter)
1/18/21 UC Davis School of Law, MLK day of Service and Celebration Each year, in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr., the law school holds an MLK Day of Service and Celebration on the MLK Monday holiday. The Black Law Students Association (BLSA), Law Students Association (LSA), and the MLK Day Working Group made up of students from each class year, come together with members of the administration and faculty to put on this great day-long event.  
1/18/21 City of Davis, Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Join in the 27th Annual City of Davis celebration honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This year's program includes highlights of speakers and entertainment from past years and current messages from local youth, as well as an introduction from Mayor Gloria Partida. The program will be available beginning 9:00 a.m. on Monday, January 18 through the end of the month via the City of Davis website. Additionally, it will be shown on DCTV_Channel 15 and broadcast on KDRT 95.7 FM https://davismedia.org/.
1/19/21 UC Davis HEDI, Growing as a Community: Foundations of Anti-Racism As our communities grapple with the historic social injustices across our nation, it’s critical to hear from our leaders about the importance of adopting an equity and anti-racism lens to aid in the healing and well-being of our communities. We will discuss the following: Building institutional capacity to address historical and present implications of racism; The impact and continuation of racism in healthcare; Engaging in anti-racism work as a community Featured guests: Kupiri Ackerman-Barger, Phd, RN, CNE, FAAN, Associate Dean for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Director of Faculty Development for Education and Training, Associate Clinical Professor, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing; Jann Murray-Garcia, MD, MPH, Associate Health Sciences Clinical Professor, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, UC Davis Health; Victoria Ngo, Phd, Postdoctoral Scholar, Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, UC Davis Health; Mercedes Piedra, MS, Director for Office for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UC Davis Health
1/19/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"An Integral Portion of this Republic"

Professor Christopher Bonner - This chapter explores the ways free black northerners used citizenship to protest their disfranchisement. Focusing largely on the struggle for voting rights in New York, I also examine efforts of activists in that state to connect with others across the North who faced similar restrictions. Together, these black Americans argued that their contributions to their communities made them citizens, and that citizenship must entail formal political rights. The chapter explores questions about the construction of citizen status as well as its uncertain relation to other ideals including freedom and equality. 
1/20/21 UC Davis HEDI, Racial Healing Circle We are creating a safe space to build a community of belonging for a collective impact on racial justice. Join the UC Davis Health Office for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion for our virtual racial healing circle, facilitated by: Mercedes Piedra, MS: Director for UCDH Office for Health Equity, Diversity & Inclusion; Rangineh Azimzadeh Tosang, MA, CPF: Founder of Solh Resolutions International
1/20/21 Book Project: Bias and Racism in Mental Health and Mental Health Treatment A talk by Hendry Ton, associate vice chancellor, Office of Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, UC Davis Health & clinical professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.
1/21/21 UC Davis HEDI, Addressing Privilege and Anti-Blackness in Academic Medicine Addressing Privilege and Anti-Blackness in Academic Medicine invites participants to consider how racial inequities persists in the health care research system. This interactive session will explore ways that UC Davis Health can be a part of the solution. Participants will bring their expertise and experiences so that we can identify sites for personal and collective action. Topics covered include: Legacies of exclusion within academic medicine; Mistrust of academic medicine by Black communities and communities of color; Needed changes in clinical work, research systems, mentoring/teaching practices, and administrative structures; Barriers preventing the advancement of medical researchers dedicated to racial equity; This conversation will augment efforts toward self-education and create community in efforts to redress the legacies of white supremacy in academic medicine.
1/25/21 Racial Justice Speaker Series: Tracie Olson, Yolo County Public Defender Tracie Olson, Yolo County Public Defender - More information to follow.
1/26/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"The Rights of the Citizens of Massachusetts”: African American Sailors in Southern Ports in the 1830s."

Professor Kate Masur, Northwestern - This chapter explores how and why residents of Massachusetts mobilized to protect the freedom of Black sailors who were imprisoned in southern port cities. Along the way, it examines how antebellum Americans understood citizenship under the Constitution’s privileges and immunities clause (Article IV, section 2). 
1/27/21 Making the Unconscious Conscious: Understanding and Mitigating Bias

Participants will be introduced to theory and language in understanding implicit and explicit bias. Using personal reflection, experiential exercises and case studies, participants will gain greater awareness when they engage in bias and gain essential knowledge and skills (tools) in how they recognize and mitigate biases in both personal and professional domains.

Faculty and staff are invited to register for this course through Staff Development and Professional Services (SDPS).

2/2/21 Implementing the Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Vision

Every organization is called upon to implement UC Davis' Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Vision. In support of our campus' "To Boldly Go" vision, this session provides an understanding of the goals in the diversity, equity and inclusion strategic vision and the opportunity to explore how organizations may integrate diversity and inclusion as informed by their work.

Faculty and staff are invited to register for this course through Staff Development and Professional Services (SDPS).

2/2/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"Mary Chinaman: Trafficking, Runaways, and the Law in the American West"

Professor Beth Lew-Williams - This work-in-progress considers the experience of female Chinese runaways in the 19th-century U.S. West. By focusing on their fugitive movements—what they wished to escape, how they fled, and where they sought refuge—the chapter examines the multiple and intertwining forces that conditioned Chinese women's lives. This is part of a larger book project on the legal regulation of race and alienage in the American West. While previous scholarship has focused on how federal law “excluded” the Chinese from the nation and erected immigration controls at its borders, this book will ask how local and state law “included” the Chinese within the political economy and forged a racial regime in the interior.
2/4/21 Is it Bullying? Awareness, Understanding & Strategies

The objectives of this course are to increase awareness and understanding about bullying and other forms of abrasive behaviors in the workplace, become familiar with the policies and resources related to bullying and other forms of abrasive behavior. Participants will learn skills for responding to abrasive behaviors in the workplace, examine one’s own behavior (self-reflection) that impacts interaction with colleagues and workplace climate, and explore strategies for empowering ourselves and others in cultivating inclusive work environments. Throughout the course, participants will have the opportunity to discuss hypothetical workplace case studies and apply various proactive and response strategies to these cases.

Faculty and staff are invited to register for this course through Staff Development and Professional Services (SDPS).

2/9/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"Becoming Mobile in the Age of Segregation: Public Conveyances and the Fight for Black Citizenship"

Professor Elizabeth Pryor - In the United States, in the early 19th century, Black abolitionists and elite free people of color took advantage of the newly emerging technologies of travel--stagecoaches, steamships, railroads-- to expand their social, economic and activist networks. Calling themselves "colored travelers," they (like all Americans) believed that full access to public conveyances was a fundamental right to which they were entitled as U.S. citizens. Nevertheless, they confronted white supremacist ideologies that prevented them from access, and in turn, Black activists established the cars, compartments and cabins of public vehicles as the frontlines for the battle over equal rights. 
2/10/21 UC Davis Library, Renate Chancellor, "Libraries, Leadership and Social Justice: Lessons from E.J. Josey" Librarian, educator and activist E.J. Josey stands out within the broader social and political landscape of civil rights for his courage and leadership in desegregating the library profession. As president of the American Library Association (ALA) from 1984 to 1985, he successfully drafted a resolution preventing state library associations from discriminating against librarians of color — an act considered by many to have desegregated the ALA. During this online talk, Dr. Renate Chancellor, author of E. J. Josey: Transformational Leader of the Modern Library Profession (2020), will seek to answer the following questions: How did Josey transform the modern profession? What lessons can we take from his leadership and apply today?
2/16/21 Book Project: Mental Health & Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice "Mental Health: Reimaging and Reinventing Our Community Response," a forum on mental health & law enforcement and criminal justice featuring the UC Davis Police Department, Yolo County District Attorney’s Office & UC Davis Police Accountability Board.
2/16/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"On the Antebellum Fringe: Lumbee Indians, Slavery, and Removal"

Professor Malinda Maynor Lowery - This essay illuminates how the Lumbee challenge the dominant narrative of antebellum southern history. It reminds readers that Natives did not simply depart the region in 1838, and that removal entailed metaphorical destruction as much as forced migration. It also shows how one Native community struggled to work through the South’s stilted racial binary and continue to shape regional culture. In addition, it demonstrates how the Lumbee survived the tumultuous changes by maintaining flexible ties to family, religion, and place. They persisted in an increasingly hostile environment by adapting some aspects of white culture, including apprenticeship and marriage, and by building literacy and practicing Christianity. Those Lumbee who participated in black market activities continued to maintain close ties to kin who endeavored to meet social challenges through legal channels. Their efforts provided a sense of social unity that defined their sense of belonging and drew boundaries around their community. 
2/17/21 Police Accountability Board Public Meeting Due to the current measures being taken in response to COVID-19, the Police Accountability Board's Public meeting will be held online via Zoom with board representatives in attendance.
2/23/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"Everyday Use: A History of Civil Rights in Black Churches"

Professor Dylan Penningroth - This article seeks to revise the history of civil rights by closely examining one strand of black people’s long engagement with legal rules, legal ideas, and legal institutions: the private law of religion. After the Civil War, millions of African Americans began to exercise civil rights of property, standing, and contract, a set of rights whose significance scholars of the black freedom struggle have downplayed or dismissed. By the Jim Crow era, African Americans were putting the paradigmatic civil rights of the nineteenth century to everyday use. But the question of whether they had civil rights in church—rights that a court could protect—highlighted a longstanding tension between two influential nineteenth-century theories of rights. While common-law rights belonged to both men and women, privileges within religious associations depended on one’s status. This concentrated authority at the top, especially in men, raising questions about the rights of churchmembers, who were mostly women. The “deference doctrine” did not stop black people from going to court. But during the early 1900s, as some black churches amassed huge memberships and property, and as black denominations became national corporations, legal doctrines developed in the mid-1800s—developed in part from black church cases—enabled black male leaders to amass extraordinary authority. 
2/25/21 Never Surrender: The Fight for Environmental Justice in Bayview Hunters Point This documentary film by Dr. M. Reza Shirazi is the result of more than two years of research and fieldwork in the Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco. It narrates the community fight for environmental justice, and documents the conflict between people and government over the safety of the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard Superfund Site. Decades of remediation work at Hunters Point Shipyard, a former military base contaminated during the Second World War and beyond, were reported to be fraudulent and data were falsified. This turned the biggest re-development project in San Francisco into one of the worst toxic and radioactive scandals in US history.
3/2/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"Manila Prepares for Independence: Filipina/o Campaigns for U.S. Citizenship on the Eve of Philippine Decolonization"

Professor Jane Hong - This book chapter examines the Philippine Commonwealth Government’s role in the success of the 1946 Luce-Celler Act’s provisions making Filipina/os eligible for U.S. citizenship. Drawing from U.S. and Philippine archives, it charts how Philippine officials adopted the legislative cause as part of their broader preparations for Philippine independence. They anticipated that Filipina/o communities in the United States would be vital to Philippine state-building projects after independence and sought to inculcate in Filipina/o Americans a sense of responsibility to the islands that transcended formal citizenship. A centering of Manila’s role in the Washington-based naturalization campaign reveals Philippine officials’ instrumental understanding of the U.S. citizenship bill as a means to achieve their own national goals. More broadly, it foregrounds decolonization and anticolonial movements in Asia as important levers driving the dismantling of race-based exclusion laws targeting Asian peoples. 
3/3/21 Racial Justice Speaker Series: Paul Butler, Professor, Georgetown Law More information to follow.
3/9/21 Racial Justice Speaker Series: Song Richardson, Dean, UC Irvine Law More information to follow.
3/11 Is it Bullying? Awareness, Understanding & Strategies The objectives of this course are to increase awareness and understanding about bullying and other forms of abrasive behaviors in the workplace, become familiar with the policies and resources related to bullying and other forms of abrasive behavior. Participants will learn skills for responding to abrasive behaviors in the workplace, examine one’s own behavior (self-reflection) that impacts interaction with colleagues and workplace climate, and explore strategies for empowering ourselves and others in cultivating inclusive work environments. Throughout the course, participants will have the opportunity to discuss hypothetical workplace case studies and apply various proactive and response strategies to these cases.
3/16/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S., Professor Joshua Reid, University of Washington

Joshua L Reid (registered member of the Snohomish Indian Nation) is an associate professor of American Indian Studies and the John Calhoun Smith Memorial Endowed Professor of History at the University of Washington where he also directs the Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest. He is author of The Sea is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs (Yale, 2015), for which he has received numerous awards. Reid researches and teaches about histories of American Indians and Indigenous peoples, the North American West, the environment, and Pacific Worlds.
3/30/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"Race, Economic Discrimination, and the Politics Homeownership Expansion"

Professor Chloe Thurston - A marker of social and economic inclusion, Americans have long been encouraged to view homeownership as “privately owned and privately earned,” neglecting the substantial role of federal policy interventions that have enabled citizens to obtain mortgages on affordable terms. This talk, based on a recently published book, examines how civil rights advocates came to recognize and then contest the role of the state in constraining Black Americans’ freedom to fully participate in the housing market on equal terms as white Americans during two periods: first, in the aftermath of the creation of the Federal Housing Administration, and second, in the 1960s as the push for inclusion into homeownership traveled down the income scale. By making legible the role of the government (rather than an unencumbered free market) in shaping the contours of the housing market, civil rights actors challenged the economic and political basis of their constituents’ exclusion.
3/31/21 Racial Justice Speaker Series: Jack Chin, Professor, UC Davis School of Law More information to follow.
4/6/21

Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S.,

"Reconstruction and the Long History of Equal Access to Court Testimony"

Professor Pippa Holloway - The standard narrative of the equalization of court testimony as being accomplished through the Civil Rights Act of 1866 overlooks a longer, more complicated story.  African Americans found ways around barriers to testimony against whites in certain instances during the slave era.  White southerners – including prosecutors, crime victims, and judges – supported African American testimony in some cases when it was needed for the conviction of particularly dangerous white criminal offenders. Restrictions on testimony pitted legislatures against courts, and courts sometimes resisted restrictions on evidence when these restrictions did not serve the ends of justice.
4/7/21 Racial Justice Speaker Series: Raquel Aldana, Professor, UC Davis School of Law More information to follow.
4/13/21 Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S., Paul Finkelman, Ph.D, President of Gratz College Paul Finkelman received his B.A. in American Studies from Syracuse University in 1971 and his Ph.D. in history from the University of Chicago in 1976.  He was later a Fellow in Law and Humanities at Harvard Law School. He has held a number of endowed chairs as a tenured professor or as a visitor, including the Ariel F. Sallows Chair in Human Rights Law at the University of Saskatchewan, the John Hope Franklin Chair in American Legal History at Duke Law School, and the President William McKinley Distinguished Professor at Albany Law School.   In 2017 he held the Fulbright Chair in Human Rights and Social Justice at the University of Ottawa School of Law, in Ottawa, Canada and was also the John E. Murray Visiting Professor at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.  He is the author of more than 200 scholarly articles and the author or editor of more than fifty books.  His most recent book, Supreme Injustice:  Slavery in the Nation’s Highest Court, was published by Harvard University Press in 2018. 
4/16/21 UC Davis Center for Poverty & Inequality Research, Steven Roberts, Psychology, Stanford University, "Racism: A Developmental Story" Racism – often conceptualized as disliking or mistreating others because of their race – is a system of advantage based on race. In this talk, I will share my personal and professional experiences within this system, and highlight how the two have developed hand in hand. Specifically, I will address racism in our categories, churches, relationships, and science. In doing so, I will aim to make three broader points. First, racism shapes our lives in ways that are often unappreciated and unrecognized. Second, racism shapes our lives from childhood well into adulthood and beyond. Third, our own experiences with racism (and race) inform who and what we study. I will conclude, as a human and as a psychologist, with recommendations for an anti-racist future. 
4/20/21 Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S., Professor Julian Lim, Arizona State University Julian Lim is an associate professor of History at Arizona State University. She holds a bachelor's degree in literature and a law degree from UC Berkeley, and received her doctorate in history from Cornell University. Trained in history and law, she focuses on immigration, borders, and race, and has taught in both history department and law school settings.  Lim's award-winning first book, Porous Borders: Multiracial Migrations and the Law in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), examines the history of diverse immigrants in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, and the development of immigration policy and law on both sides of the border. 
4/27/21 Law School - AOKI Center/History Department colloquium on Free People of Color: Race, Law and Freedom in the 19th and 20th Century U.S., Gabriel "Jack" Chin, Edward L. Barrett Jr. Chair of Law, Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law, and Director of Cli

Gabriel "Jack" Chin is a teacher and scholar of Immigration Law, Criminal Procedure, and Race and Law. His scholarship has appeared in the Penn, UCLA, Cornell, and Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties law reviews and the Yale, Duke and Georgetown law journals among others.  The U.S. Supreme Court cited his work on collateral consequences of criminal conviction in Chaidez v. United States, 133 S. Ct. 1103, 1109 (2013), in which the Court called his Cornell Law Review article “the principal scholarly article on the subject” and in Padilla v. Kentucky, 130 S. Ct. 1473 (2010), which agreed with his contention that the Sixth Amendment required defense counsel to advise clients about potential deportation consequences of guilty pleas.  Justice Sotomayor cited his Penn Law Review article in her dissent in Utah v. Strieff, 136 S. Ct. 2056, 2070 (2016).

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